“God’s people should be bighearted and courteous.”

Tit 3:2 TM

Gratitude comes with a host of benefits. It improves your heart rhythm, reduces stress, and helps you heal physically and think more clearly under pressure. It floods your body and brain with endorphins that strengthen and rejuvenate you. And like any muscle, the more you exercise it the stronger it grows. It doesn’t have to be complicated; just take a walk and think about your blessings and it will set the tone for your day. The Psalmist said, “Praise the Lord and do not forget all his kindnesses” (Ps 103:2 NCV). God’s blessings operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Try this: When you sit down to eat, have everyone at the table name something they’re thankful for. There’s always something: An elderly lady at a nursing home said, “I thank you, Lord, for two good teeth, one upper and one lower. And I thank you that they meet!” Psychologist Martin Seligman suggests sending a letter or email of gratitude to somebody, then visiting that person and reading it to them. People who say thank you are measurably happier and less depressed. The CEO of Campbell Soup wrote over sixteen thousand thank-you notes to his employees, and energized the entire company in the process. Go ahead, encourage your friends and co-workers by letting them know you appreciate what they do. The Bible says, “God’s people should be bighearted and courteous.” One author observes: “You have it in your power to increase the sum total of the world’s happiness by giving a few words of sincere appreciation to someone who’s lonely or discouraged. Perhaps you’ll forget the kind words you say today, but the recipient may cherish them for a lifetime.”